High blood pressure signs

There are usually no signs to point to high blood pressure. The patient can feel perfectly fine and have a high blood pressure and never be aware of it. One of the high blood pressure signs that can occur, albeit rarely, are frequent headaches, but this is not usually the case. Having your blood pressure checked often will be the only way to make sure that your pressure is in normal ranges.

The most clear cut high blood pressure signs are the reading that the doctor gets when your blood pressure is checked. These numbers are used to diagnose people of all ages with high blood pressure and you will most likely have it checked many times during the course of your life. Children should have their blood pressure monitored as well to make sure that they are in normal ranges.

When you visit the doctor and have your blood pressure checked, ask what the numbers are each time. Many times the doctor will not let you know what your blood pressure reading is, but it can be helpful to know and understand your reading.

There are some things that you should do before you have your blood pressure checked to be sure that you are not artificially elevating your reading which will cause you to have high blood pressure signs. Do not drink any caffeine or smoke for thirty minutes before your blood pressure is checked. Try to sit for at least five minutes before the test as well. Movement can cause your readings to be elevated. Empty your bladder before the test as this can cause a high reading as well.

If you have high blood pressure signs from your reading, the doctor will begin treatment immediately. High blood pressure is treated with a combination of lifestyle changes and medication. Often times, all that is needed are lifestyle changes. Eating a healthy diet and maintaining a healthy body weight are one of the primary factors in your blood pressure. Smoking is also a cause of high blood pressure. Make sure that you are getting an adequate amount of exercise everyday and learn how to handle your stress.

Your diet is likely to be the first area where you can make some significant changes to your lifestyle. The doctor will advise you to eat a diet that is low in fat and cholesterol as well as salt. Fruits, vegetables, lean proteins and whole grains are a part of the healthy diet to combat high blood pressure. For many people, changing the way that they eat is often a great stride in eliminating the high blood pressure signs.

Salt intake is one of the areas where you should pay careful attention. This means that you will have to read your food labels carefully to be sure that there are not excessive amounts of sodium. The standard rule is to eat no more than one teaspoon of salt in a day.

Reducing your weight will most likely occur when you follow the healthy diet and get enough physical activity. Pay attention to your weight and aim for a reasonable weight loss in the beginning stages of your treatment. Setting realistic goals will help you to stay on track and get your blood pressure under control.

For many people, eliminating the high blood pressure signs is as simple as paying careful attention to your lifestyle. Others may require a blood pressure medication when the usual methods don’t work. Keep your stress at a manageable level and quit smoking along with your healthy diet. You will not only lower your blood pressure, but you will also feel great at the same time.

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Last updated on Sep 28th, 2009 and filed under Cardiovascular Disorders. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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